Team: Developers

Welcome to the engine room!

We develop the lib.reviews platform. That’s both server-side and client-side code and design (!), as well as any additional tools, apps, etc. If you’re technically minded but want to help more with docs, developer outreach, user needs analysis, you’re also more than welcome to join.

For now we use this team primarily to keep a diary of our work.

Number of members: 2 (view list)

Moderators:

Team rules

You agree to license all technical contributions under CC-0 (public domain); see: https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

We’ve opted for these terms for our codebase to make re-use and extension minimally complex.

This team has not published any reviews yet.


ElasticSearch, Node & Ubuntu upgraded

As part of routine systems maintenance, I’ve updated the following components:

  • ElasticSearch to version 7.8 (which adds improved stemming for some languages, but required significant changes to the search code)

  • Node to the 12.x LTS series

  • Ubuntu on the server from the 16.04 LTS series to 18.04 LTS

There should be no significant user-facing impact of these changes, but if you notice anything no longer working as it did, please don’t hesitate to file an issue.


Smoothing Sign In and Sign Up

My first patch for Lib.Reviews went live earlier this month! A small ease of use feature for users. When you follow a link to a lib.reviews page and click sign in or register from that page, you will now be redirected to the page you came from. This feature will be very nice to have as lib.reviews grows and users become more likely to enter the site from arbitrary links.

The second feature went online last week. This patch ia a hidden ease of use feature for non-english users. Users can post links with a signupLanguage query to advertise registration for lib.reviews in any supported language. Say all your friends speak esperanto, you would send them lib.reviews/register?signupLanguage=eo so the website will show up in esperanto without having to search for the language drop down. This should help new users feel welcome right away.


lib.reviews on Mastodon

Mastodon is one of the most exciting developments in open source of the last couple of years: a decentralized social network that is actually taking off. If you’re unfamiliar, here is a good concise introduction, and here is a more comprehensive one.

The super-short version is that, like email, Mastodon is spread across many servers that talk to each other. You can follow users on any server, and messages spread through the network as needed. Each server gets a limited view of the total network, based on who the users on that server are interacting with.

This isn’t a new idea: GNU Social and Diaspora are following a similar model (GNU Social and Mastodon are interoperable). But Mastodon is very user-friendly, development is very active, and a rich ecosystem of apps and communities is forming around it. Exciting times!

As far as lib.reviews is concerned, there’s now a quiet little account you can follow on Mastodon. Down the road, I’d love to explore whether we can make lib.reviews actually talk to the federated social media universe. For starters, it shouldn’t be too hard to make it possible to follow lib.reviews users on Mastodon, thanks to the ActivityPub standard. Help, as always, is most welcome.


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